BBQ Brown Rice and Portobello Burgers [Vegan, Gluten-Free]

BBQ Brown Rice and Portobello Burgers [Vegan, Gluten-Free]

BBQ Brown Rice and Portobello Burgers [Vegan, Gluten-Free]

These rich and meaty suckers will come through for you on a hot spring day when the burger craving hits. Rich, meaty, and mushroom-y with a hit of smoky BBQ sauce to make them fresh-off-the-grill satisfying. The ingredient list is minimal, yes, but the flavor is maximum greatness. Spoon them with some caramelized onions, a dollop of vegan mayo, and extra BBQ sauce. Definitely, definitely put them between two buns and eat them in the blazing sun with a generous side of baked french fries.

  • 1 1/4 cups cooked brown rice
  • 2 cups Portobello mushrooms, small diced, stems removed
  • 1/2 yellow onion, small diced
  • 1 tablespoon chia seed
  • 3 tablespoons walnuts
  • 1 heaping tablespoon quick oats
  • 2-3 tablespoons BBQ sauce plus more for topping
  • 1 tablespoon tamari
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • Optional toppings: brioche burger buns, caramelized onions, vegan goat cheese, vegan cheddar cheese, lettuce, tomato, vegan mayonnaise
    1. Preheat oven to 450°F.
    2. In a large pan over medium-high heat, heat 1 tablespoon of oil. When the oil is hot, add the onions and mushrooms. Cook for 5-7, until they are golden brown and glistening.
    3. Meanwhile, in a food processor add the oats, chia seeds, and walnuts and pulse for 10 seconds to make a rough flour. Add the brown rice, cooked mushrooms and onions, the BBQ sauce, tamari, cumin and salt and pepper. Pulse about 12-15 times until the mixture starts to clump together. Taste and add more BBQ sauce, salt, or cumin if you like it more salty or spicy.
    4. Use damp hands to form four equal-sized burgers and place on a parchment lined baking sheet. Mixture will be wet but not difficult to form.
    5. Bake for 24-27 min, until the burgers have crisped up nicely on the outside.
    6. Serve right away with your favorite burger toppings. […]
Plant-based diet? Sure, but first understand what it means.

Plant-based diet? Sure, but first understand what it means.

Plant-based diet? Sure, but first understand what it means.

The concept of eating a “plant-based” diet is tossed around frequently, but it’s a label that can be confusing. Some people shy away from the notion because they assume that plant-based is code for vegan. On the other hand, it’s easy to think that eating all plants and no animals guarantees that your diet is healthful and nutritious. But does it?

The research in support of plant-based diets is bountiful, which is likely because of what they include — vitamins, minerals, phytonutrients and fiber — as much as what they don’t — excess saturated fat. But one limitation of much […]

The Rawtarian diet

The Rawtarian diet

The Rawtarian diet

Laura-Jane Koers says eating raw a great way to increase intake of fresh fruits and greens Her decision to ‘go raw’ five years ago transformed her life and Laura-Jane Koers, known online as The Rawtarian, has never looked back. The Halifax-based cook, author, photographer and blogger is now a leading creator of simple, satisfying vegan recipes. She is the author of Cook Lively, the host of The Raw Food Podcast, and her recipes and photography have been featured in The Huffington Post, The National Post and Vegan Life magazine. She is also an active speaker on the business of […]

Plant-Based Diet vs. Vegan: Are They Same or Different?

Plant-Based Diet vs. Vegan: Are They Same or Different?

Plant-Based Diet vs. Vegan: Are They Same or Different?

Credit: Pixabay

An often heard word when people discuss or mention their eating or dietary preferences is the term “vegan.” And, some say they only consume a plant-based diet. While they may seem similar, there are some subtle differences between the two. We are going to make a comparison of a plant-based diet vs. vegan to see if they are the same or different.

Read on to know more about these diets so that you will be able to identify the types of food in each of these dietary choices. Difference between Plant-Based Diet and Vegan Diet If you think […]

Pasta Bolognese With Red Wine [Vegan, Gluten-Free]

Pasta Bolognese With Red Wine [Vegan, Gluten-Free]

Pasta Bolognese With Red Wine [Vegan, Gluten-Free]

Pasta Bolognese as a child was so comforting. Sometimes, you just miss flavors you had as a child. This vegan version of the pasta dish is very easy to make and takes less than half an hour to cook. It doesn’t contain mushrooms like other vegan equivalents and is boasting with protein!

For the Bolognese Sauce:

  • 1 finely chopped onion
  • 1 finely chopped carrot
  • 1 finely chopped celery
  • 1 1/2 cups of textured vegetable protein (TVP)
  • A few finely chopped sun-dried tomatoes
  • 3/4 cup dry red wine (not sweet)
  • 8 tablespoons tomato pureé (or 4 tablespoons tomato paste)
  • 2 teaspoons minced garlic
  • 1 teaspoon smoked paprika powder
  • 1 teaspoon BBQ seasoning
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • Black pepper to taste
  • 2 cups water
  • 1 teaspoon oregano

    For the Other Ingredients:

    • Pasta of your choice, gluten-free if needed
      1. Very finely chop 1 onion, 1 carrot and 1 celery and sauté in a large pan in a bit of oil until softened.
      2. Then add 1 1/2 cups frozen meat-free mince (also called TVP, if you can only get the dry variety check label as you might have to prepare it separately first). Then add all other sauce ingredients. Stir and cook on medium to high heat for 15 minutes (add a bit more water if needed). If you can’t find tomato purée, then use roughly 4 tbsp of tomato paste and a bit more water. If you don’t have either then you can use tinned tomatoes in juice, but this will increase the cooking time. In this case you have to cook for roughly an hour otherwise the tomato sauce would be too acidic. Alternatively just add a tiny bit of sugar or a tiny bit of baking soda to neutralize the acidity.
      3. While the sauce is in the making cook the pasta of your choice to go with it.

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